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Routledge Global Cooperation Series

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The Routledge Global Cooperation Series develops innovative approaches to understanding, explaining and answering one of the most pressing questions of our time – how can cooperation in a culturally diverse world of nine billion people succeed? This interdisciplinary series is edited by the Directors of the Käte Hamburger Kolleg/Centre for Global Cooperation Research Tobias Debiel, Claus Leggewie and Dirk Messner.

Democracy and Climate Change

Frederic Hanusch

Routledge Global Cooperation Series
288 pages I 2017 - Routledge Hardback: ISBN 978-0-415-37116-2

Climate change is a global challenge that does not only require a global but also a determined and long-term political approach. The book Democracy and Climate Change explores how democratic principles can influence different governments in their responses to climate change. Based on a a general concept of democratic efficacy, the book provides an empirical analysis of the impact of democratic quality on climate change strategies in about 40 countries. The specific case study of Canada’s Kyoto Protocol process is then used to explain the mechanisms of democratic influence in depth. The author demonstrates with his analysis that stronger democratic qualities and the interplay of dimensions such as transparency, independence or creativity are indispensable to tackle climate change.
The publication offers a broad spectrum of research with new exciting avenues of enquiry and is aimed in particular at researchers with an interest in comparative politics, democracy studies and environmental policies.

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Knowledge Production, Area Studies and Global Cooperation

Claudias Derichs

Routledge Global Cooperation Series
202 pages I 2017 - Routledge Hardback: ISBN 978-1-138-18874-7

Whereas Area Studies and cross-border cooperation research conventionally demarcates groups of people by geographical boundaries, individuals might in fact feel more connected by shared values and principles than by conventional spatial dimensions. Knowledge Production, Area Studies and Global Cooperation asks what norms and principles lead to the creation of knowledge about cross-border cooperation and connection. It studies why theories, methods, and concepts originate in one place rather than another, how they travel, and what position the scholar adopts while doing research, particularly ‘in the field’.
Taking case studies from Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, the book links the production of alternative epistemologies to the notion of global cooperation and reassesses the ways in which the concept of connectedness can be applied at the translocal and individual rather than the formal international and collective level.

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Democratization and Memories of Violence

Mneesha Gellman

Routledge Global Cooperation Series
226 pages | 2016 - Routledge Hardback: ISBN 978-1-138-95303-1

Ethnic minority communities make claims for cultural rights from states in different ways depending on how governments include them in policies and practices of accommodation or assimilation. However, institutional explanations don't tell the whole story, as individuals and communities also protest, using emotionally compelling narratives about past wrongs to justify their claims for new rights protections.

Democratization and Memories of Violence: Ethnic minority rights movements in Mexico, Turkey, and El Salvador examines how ethnic minority communities use memories of state and paramilitary violence to shame states into cooperating with minority cultural agendas such as the right to mother tongue education. Shaming and claiming is a social movement tactic that binds historic violence to contemporary citizenship. Combining theory with empirics, the book accounts for how democratization shapes citizen experiences of interest representation and how memorialization processes challenge state regimes of forgetting at local, state, and international levels. Democratization and Memories of Violence draws on six case studies in Mexico, Turkey, and El Salvador to show how memory-based narratives serve as emotionally salient leverage for marginalized communities to facilitate state consideration of minority rights agendas.

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Gifts of Cooperation, Mauss and Pragmatism

Frank Adloff

Routledge Global Cooperation Series
182 pages | 2016 - Routledge Hardback: ISBN 978-1-138-911123

This book focuses on the contribution of Marcel Mauss (1872-1950) to social theory and a theory of cooperation. It shows that Mauss’s essay 'The Gift' (1925) can be seen as a classic of a pragmatist, interactionist and anti-utilitarian sociology. It critiques the dichotomy of self-interest and normatively orientated action that forms the basis of sociology. This conceptual dichotomization has caused forms of social interaction (that cannot be localized either on the side of self-interest or on that of morality) to be overlooked or taken little notice of. The book argues that it is the logic of the gift and its reciprocity that accompany and structure all forms of interaction, from the social micro to the macro-level. It demonstrates that in modern societies agonistic and non-agonistic gifts form their own orders of interaction.

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Humanitarianism and Challenges of Cooperation

Edited by Volker Heins, Kai Koddenbrock and Christine Unrau

Routledge Global Cooperation Series
230 pages | 2016 - Routledge Hardback: ISBN 978-1-13-896337

Humanitarianism as a moral concept and an organized practice has become a major factor in world society. It channels an enormous amount of resources and serves as an argument for different kinds of interference into the "internal affairs" of countries and regions. At the same time, and for these very reasons, it is an ideal testing ground for successful and unsuccessful cooperation across borders.
Humanitarianism and the Challenges of Cooperation examines the multiple humanitarianisms of today as a testing ground for new ways of global cooperation. General trends in the contemporary transformation of humanitarianism are studied and individual cases of how humanitarian actors cooperate with others on the ground are investigated. This book offers a highly innovative, empirically informed account of global humanitarianism from the point of view of cooperation research in which internationally renowned contributors analyse broad trends and present case studies based on meticulous fieldwork.

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Peacebuilding in Crisis: Rethinking Paradigms and Practices of Transnational Cooperation

Edited by Tobias Debiel, Thomas Held and Ulrich Schneckener

Routledge Global Cooperation Series
264 pages | 2 B/W Illus. | 2016 - Routledge Hardback: ISBN 978-1-13-885859-6

The 1990s saw a constant increase in international peace missions, predominantly led by the United Nations, whose mandates were more and more extended to implement societal and political transformations in post-conflict societies. However, in many cases these missions did not meet the high expectations and did not acquire a sufficient legitimacy on the local level. Written by leading experts in the field, this edited volume brings together 'liberal' and 'post-liberal' approaches to peacebuilding. Besides challenging dominant peacebuilding paradigms, the book scrutinizes how far key concepts of post-liberal peacebuilding offer sound categories and new perspectives to reframe peacebuilding research. It thus moves beyond the 'liberal'-'post-liberal' divide and systematically integrates further perspectives, paving the way for a new era in peacebuilding research which is theory-guided, but also substantiated in the empirical analysis of peacebuilding practices.
This book will be essential reading for postgraduate students and scholar-practitioners working in the field of peacebuilding. By embedding the subject area into different research perspectives, the book will also be relevant for scholars who come from related backgrounds, such as democracy promotion, transitional justice, statebuilding, conflict and development research and international relations in general.

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Global Cooperation and the Human Factor in International Relations

Edited by Dirk Messner and Silke Weinlich

Routledge Global Cooperation Series
272 pages | 27 B/W Illus. | 2016 - Routledge Hardback: ISBN 978-1-13891299-1

This book aims to pave the way for a new interdisciplinary approach to global cooperation research. It does so by bringing in disciplines whose insights about human behaviour might provide a crucial yet hitherto neglected foundation for understanding how and under which conditions global cooperation can succeed. As the first profoundly interdisciplinary book dealing with global cooperation, it provides the state of the art on human cooperation in selected disciplines (evolutionary anthropology and biology, decision-sciences, social psychology, complex system sciences), written by leading experts. The book argues that scholars in the field of global governance should know and could learn from what other disciplines tell us about the capabilities and limits of humans to cooperate. This new knowledge will generate food for thought and cause creative disturbances, allowing us a different interpretation of the obstacles to cooperation observed in world politics today. It also offers first accounts of interdisciplinary global cooperation research, for instance by exploring the possibilities and consequences of global we-identities, by describing the basic cooperation mechanism that are valid across disciplines, or by bringing an evolutionary perspective to diplomacy.

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Editorial Board
Prof. Tobias Debiel
Prof. Claus Leggewie
Prof. Dirk Messner