Publications

Other Publications

In order to encourage ongoing dialogue with the academic community, we include, under this heading, any publication by staff or fellows of the Centre that explores themes relating to their specified area of research. The list is continually updated and cites both open and non-open sources.

Muslims at German Universities — Religious Competence Strengthens Diversity and Internationalization

Muslims are the biggest non-christian religious community in Germany. This also poses a new challenge to universities, since the share of Muslim students is increasing as a result of immigration and improved educational mobility of children of migrant worker generations. How do the universities' ideological neutrality and exemplary function respond to the freedom of religion and the imperative of non-discrimination? How should universities deal with the religious needs of Muslim students and other national or international members of the university?

Against this background, the recent duz Special reflects religious competence as a new challenge to universities. It presents the findings of a study that has been conducted at the Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities (KWI) and funded by the Käte Hamburger Kolleg/Centre for Global Cooperation Research as well as the Mercator Foundation. For this purpose, the researchers asked Muslim students in Germany for their needs and experiences and conducted a nationwide survey to find out if and how universities are offering spaces of religion and spirituality (and how these are being valued). They also conducted interviews in Great Britain and the USA to draw on experiences there with the aim to initiate a learning process. Over twelve pages, the authors, among them also Volker M. Heins, Head of Research Unit 2 of the Centre and project leader, introduce their key results.

Altiner, Tugba, Heins, Volker M., Potempa, Christoph, and Supik, Linda (2017): Muslime an deutschen Hochschulen. Religiöse Kompetenz stärkt Vielfalt und Internationalisierung, duz Special, DUZ Verlags- und Mediengesellschaft: Berlin.

Chinese Cultural Diplomacy in the European Context. Between Sophistication and Lack of Self-Confidence

Chinese public and cultural diplomacy (CD) has always been an essential part of Chinese soft power, and Chinese government officials are more and more understanding the effectiveness of CD especially among European audiences, as cultural and intercultural concepts have a strong symbolic power. However, Chinese CD in the framework of the Belt and Road Initiative in the European context appears as a patchwork of policy actions lacking a systematic framework. In her recent analysis, Alessandra Cappelletti, Joint Fellow of GCR21 & IN-EAST, takes a closer look on projects, actors and concepts used by Chinese CD, particularly within the framework of the Belt and Road Initiative. To understand Chinese CD in Europe, she argues for a balanced combination of realism and idealism, as both approaches recognize the ambiguous character of CD: a mere instrument of power, and the ‘real’ willingness to promote a state’s culture abroad for the sake of knowledge and improved bilateral relations.

Cappelletti, Alessandra (2016): 'Chinese Cultural Diplomacy in the European Context. Between Sophistication and Lack of Self-Confidence', EU-China Observer #4.16: 9–13.

Is cross-border cooperation underpinned by an ethical code of values?

Is there an 'ethical code' of values that underpins cross-border cooperation activities? By focusing on people as 'agents', Elisabetta Nadalutti, Alumni Fellow of the Centre, argues in her newly published article that citizens and individuals in their integral development have been neglected so far when the development of cross-border spaces is scrutinized. This study aims to provide an alternative theoretical framework by focusing on the ethical dimension of cross-border cooperation through which cross-border activities can be analysed and operationalized. This is done by synergically reading Benedict XVI's 'Caritas in Veritate' and Amartya Sen's 'Development as Freedom'.

Nadalutti, Elisabetta (2016): 'Is Cross-Border Cooperation Underpinned by an Ethical Code of Values? A Theoretical Analysis', Regional & Federal Studies: 1–22.

Judicial Review Systems in West Africa

The legal systems in West Africa are – shaped by different colonial legacies, cultural and religios norms – uniquely diverse. At the same time, the region is growing together under the umbrella of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and already developed some forms of regional judiciary. However, recent announcements of resignation from the International Criminal Court (ICC) by several African countries pose serious challenges to the possibility of a cross-country judiciary.

This book compares the constitutional justice institutions in 16 West African states and analyses how mutual learning processes at the regional level can succeed in efforts to frame a common West African system. Two of the lead writers of the freely available study are Markus Böckenförde, Executive Director of the Centre, and Babacar Kanté, Senior Fellow at the Centre. 

International IDEA and Hanns Seidel Stiftung (eds.) (2016): Judicial Review Systems in West Africa. A Comparative Analysis.

Diaspora as Cultures of Cooperation

How do communities establish distinct notions of 'home' and 'belonging'? How does a diaspora presence impact the relations between 'home' and host countries? And what specific role do diasporas play, finally, in global cooperation? This book by David Carment and Ariane Sadjed, two Alumni Fellows of the Centre, examines the dynamic processes by which communities establish distinct notions of 'home' and 'belonging'. Focusing on the agency of diasporic groups, rather than (forced or voluntary) dispersion and a continued longing for the country of origin, it analyses how a diaspora presence impacts relations between 'home' and host countries. Its central concern is the specific role that diasporas play in global cooperation, including cases without a successful outcome. Bridging the divide between diaspora studies and international relations, it will appeal to sociologists, scholars of migration, anthropologists and policy-makers.

The study of diasporas was one of the focal points of the Centre in 2015 and found its expression, among others, in a workshop and a lecture on that topic organized by the two authors.

Carment, David, and Sadjed, Ariane (eds.) (2016): Diaspora as Cultures of Cooperation. Global and Local Perspectives, Wiesbaden: Springer VS.

Homophobia as a transnational problem

Although homophobia is today denounced and fought in many democracies as a violation of human rights, we observe an increase in homophobic attitudes and actions in many parts of the world as well as in cultural, religious and political movements and institutions. Hate speeches by islamist fundamentalists or right-wing populists, the persecution of lesbian and gay people in many countries, but also protests against the introduction of the homosexual marriage in Germany or anti-homosexual laws of individual US states are just a few examples for an increasing transnational homophobism. Against this background, gender identity and sexual orientation become central anchors of collective identities in both directions – as exclusive and negating identity formation or as articulations of human rights and new concepts of freedom.

The new issue of WestEnd deals with contemporary homophobia and its linkage with religion, migration and racism in the current debates about inter- and transculturality. Parts of the lecture series 'Homophobia in the Global Context' that was jointly organized in 2014 by the Centre and the Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities (KWI) in Essen, found their way into the current issue. The much-noticed series was initiated by Andreas Langenohl and Volker M. Heins, Co-head of the Centre's Research Unit 2, who also contributed a foreword in the current issue.

WestEnd 2016/02: Die Gegenwart der Homophobie, Neue Zeitschrift für Sozialforschung, Institut für Sozialforschung, Frankfurt am Main.

Social image concerns promote cooperation more than altruistic punishment

Human cooperation is enigmatic, as organisms are expected, by evolutionary and economic theory, to act principally in their own interests. However, cooperation requires individuals to sacrifice resources for each other’s benefit. Grimalda an colleagues conducted a series of novel experiments in a foraging society where social institutions make the study of social image and punishment particularly salient. Participants played simple cooperation games where they could punish non-cooperators, promote a positive social image or do so in combination with one another. This new study shows that although all these mechanisms raise cooperation above baseline levels, only when social image alone is at stake do average economic gains rise significantly above baseline. Punishment, either alone or combined with social image building, yields lower gains. Individuals’ desire to establish a positive social image thus emerges as a more decisive factor than punishment in promoting human cooperation.

Gianluca Grimalda, Andreas Pondorfer, and David P. Tracer (2016). 'Social Image Concerns Promote Cooperation More than Altruistic Punishment', Nature Communications, DOI: 10.1038/NCOMMS12288. 

Transdisciplinary and transcultural Perspectives on Global Cooperation Research

How does cooperation works? What are the preconditions fort he successful cooperation of states, international organizations and private actors to cope with global challenges? These are the main questions of UNIKATE 47. The editors Tobias Debiel and Patricia Rinck as well as the diverse authors, among others Dirk Messner, Noemi Gal-Or or David Chandler, aim to give insights in current research and debates at the Käte Hamburger Kolleg / Centre for Global Cooperation Research of the University of Duisburg-Essen.

Debiel, Tobias, and Rinck, Patricia (eds.) (2015): Globale Kooperationsforschung – Transdisziplinäre und transkulturelle Perspektiven, UNIKATE 47, Duisburg: Universität Duisburg-Essen.

Nadja Krupke, Research Assistant in Research Unit 1Nadja Krupke, M.A.

New Media Technologies as Instruments for Political Participation and Democratisation in Developing Countries

Over the past 15 to 20 years, the internet structure, the rise of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and the use of social media has increased rapidly in Africa. Particularly social online media has reached a high level of users, especially as a tool for political communication and participation. This 'electronic-democracy' can hold great advantages for African politics with regard to greater political citizenry participation, information, and democratization, but at the same time it holds several risks and disadvantages. In her empirical case study, Nadja Krupke, Research Assistant at the Centre’s Research Unit 1, asks how the internet and the usage of social online media did enhance political citizenry participation during the elections in South Africa and Zimbabwe, and more generally, how the usage of new media technologies does enhance the chance of democratic reforms in developing countries.

Krupke, Nadja (2015): New Media Technologies as Instruments for Political Participation and Democratisation in Developing Countries—A Comparison of the Media Usage in South Africa During the Elections in 2014 and in Zimbabwe During the Elections in 2013, Master-Thesis, Bochum: Ruhr Universität Bochum / Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung.

Political Narratives of Societal Change

On July 15 the research-group 'Political Narratives', in which Frank Gadinger, Head of Research Unit 4, is a member of, presented their study on narratives of progressive and pragmatics politics entitled "Progressive Politik in pragmatischen Zeiten: Politische Narrative gesellschaftlichen Wandels" at the tazcafe in Berlin. The study was published as a factory report of the German think-tank 'denkwerk demokratie' and deals with the linguistic constitution of current political transformation processes. In doing so, a further developed form of discourse analysis is used, in which the focus of analysis lies on the pragmatic everyday life dimensions of politics. On the basis of various references, several 'narratives of change' in the topical area of lifestyle and work, the city of the future, diversity of self-determined life forms, the web and the "neue Überschaubarkeit" are being elaborated and presented. Thereby widespread metaphors like 'escaping the treadmill' or the 'village' as a metaphor for new communities and "Überschaubarkeit" of one's own living conditions are worked out. The progressive-postideological pragmatism, which is reflected in those images is far apart from postdemocratic apathy and insensitivity or a 'Neo-Biedermeier', but rather forms a, most of the time, local phenomenon of creative and incremental counter projects of bottom-up contribution. The study is openly accessible.

Progressive Politik in pragmatischen Zeiten: Politische Narrative gesellschaftlichen Wandels

Gadinger, Frank/Jarzebski, Sebastian/Yildiz, Taylan (2015): Progressive Politik in pragmatischen Zeiten: Politische Narrative gesellschaftlichen Wandels. Werkbericht Nr. 6. Denkwerk Demokratie.

Dr. Frank Gadinger

The Play of International Practice

The core claims of the practice turn in International Relations (IR) remain ambiguous. What promises does international practice theory hold for the field? How does the kind of theorizing it produces differ from existing perspectives? What kind of research agenda does it produce?
The newly published article by Frank Gadinger, Head of the Centre's Research Unit 4, and Christian Bueger addresses these questions. They argue that 'practice theories are a heterogeneous family, but share a range of core commitments. Realizing the promise of the practice turn requires considering the full spectrum of its approaches. However, the field primarily draws on trajectories in international practice theory that emphasize reproduction and hierarchies. It should pay greater attention to practice approaches rooted in pragmatism and that emphasize contingency and change.'
The full article is available online - please follow the link:

Bueger, Christian / Gadinger, Frank (2015): The Play of International Practice, in: International Studies Quarterly, first published online 22 May.

Patricia Rinck, M.A.

Power Sharing and Democratic Peacebuilding in Post-Conflict Societies - The Case of Sierra Leone

In this publication Patricia Rinck, researcher at the Centre, examines the role of power sharing within the process of democratic peacebuilding in post-conflict societies. Since the 1990s power sharing has become a common practice in ending violent conflicts, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subsequent to a theoretical discussion follows a case study, analysing the effects of the Lomé Peace Agreement on the post-conflict society of Sierra Leone. By evaluating interviews conducted in 2013 as well as examining shortcoming in the agreement itself and its implementation process, the study proposes practical consequences for designing and implementing similar power sharing agreements in the future.

Rinck, Patricia (2015): Power Sharing and Democratic Peacebuilding in Post-Conflict Societies: The Case of Sierra Leone, Publication series of the Institute for Political Science at the University Duisburg-Essen, Volume 22, Tectum Verlag Marburg.

Mneesha Gellman, Ph.D.

Teaching silence in the schoolroom: whither national history in Sierra Leone and El Salvador?

The article by Mneesha Gellman, that she worked on during her fellowship at the Centre, is now published at the Third World Quarterly Vol. 36 (1). Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in each country, the article addresses the divergent cultures of silence and memorialisation about the civil wars in Sierra Leone and El Salvador, and examines the role that sites of remembering and forgetting play in crafting post-war citizens.

Gellman, Mneesha (2015): Teaching silence in the schoolroom: whither national history in Sierra Leone and El Salvador?, in: Third World Quarterly Volume 36, Issue 1.

Prof. David Carment, Ph.D.

CIFP 2014 Fragility Report

The CIFP conflict risk project, headed by our current Senior Fellow David Carment from Carleton University, has released its latest state fragility report and rankings with a special focus on the Middle East and North Africa.

Assessing State Fragility, With a Focus on the Middle East and North Africa Region: A 2014 Country  Indicators for Foreign Policy Report

Dr. Silke Weinlich

“The Stars are aligned”: Now bring them down to Earth!

"This is the time for governments to bring a universal agenda down to earth to translate lofty aspirations into feasible policies for the better of all of humanity and the planet it happens to inhabit."
The Current Column of German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik on the kick off negotiations on a new universal agenda for sustainable development written by Steffen Bauer and Silke Weinlich.

Bauer, Steffen / Weinlich, Silke (2015): “The Stars are aligned”: Now bring them down to Earth!, The current column, 19.01.2015, Bonn: German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).

Dr Ángela Suárez-Collado

The Project of Advanced Regionalisation in Morocco: Analysis of a Lampedusian Reform

'The Project of Advanced Regionalisation in Morocco: Analysis of a Lampedusian Reform' is the title of an recently published article by Postdoc Fellow Ángela Suárez-Collado and Raquel Ojeda García. The article is part of an special issue on 'Continuity and change before and after the Arab uprisings in Morocco, Tunisia and Egypt' of the British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies and can be accessed online and for free at the link below.

Ojeda García, Raquel / Suárez-Collado, Ángela (2014): The Project of Advanced Regionalisation in Morocco: Analysis of a Lampedusian Reform, in: British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies
Volume 42, Issue 1, 2015.

Recent Publication: International Practice Theory - New Perspectives

Practices, such as working, etiquette, shopping, and eating, are the main drivers of everyday human life. They are patterns of regulation in our daily activities with each other. Although the turn to “practice” is not new to humanities and social sciences, the study of practices and its corresponding conceptual vocabularies and research methodologies have only gained traction in International Relations research in recent years. What does it mean, then, to study the dynamics of world politics through the lens of practices? By moving away from fixed assumptions of human behavior in terms of interests and norms, international practice scholars focus on what actors do and say in their engagement with the world as well as how these everyday actions are embedded into a larger social context. They examine what practical knowledge is necessary to conduct international politics and how groups of actors – such as diplomats, pirates or financial analysts – technologies, and other objects build what we refer to as the ‘international’.

Read More

Dr Markus Böckenförde

The Incest-Debate in Germany – Lessons to be Learned for the Promotion of Human Rights?

The Centre's Executive Director and Senior Researcher Markus Böckenförde comments in the Current Column of the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE) on the incest debate in Germany and its possible implications for global cooperation. The debate was initiated by the recommendation of the German Ethics Council to decriminalise consensual sexual relations between adult siblings. In the column Markus Böckenförde argues that the heated reactions against the recommendation highlight the continious and cumbersome process of adjusting deeply rooted cultural values in a society towards a human rights culture. Being able to witness such a process in our home country may sensitize our activities in the field of development cooperation.

Böckenförde, Markus (2014): What German Development Cooperation Can Learn from the Incest Debate, The Current Column of 8 October, Bonn: German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).

Remembering violence: the role of apology and dialogue in Turkey's democratization process

The article "Remembering violence: the role of apology and dialogue in Turkey's democratization process" of our fellow Mneesha Gellman, that she wrote a few years back, has become available as a free download. If you are interested in the subject, please follow the link below.

Gellmann, Mneesha (2012): Remembering violence: the role of apology and dialogue in Turkey's democratization process, in: Democratization Volume 20, Issue 4, 2013. 

Remembering violence: the role of apology and dialogue in Turkey's democratization process

The UN Climate Summit 2014 in New York - The evolution continues

Dirk Messner, co-director of the centre and director of the Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungsforschung / German Development Institute (DIE), in the column of the DIE on the climate summit of the United Nations, which took place on 23 September 2014 in New York. Notwithstanding the fact of still increasing emissions, the perspectives for Paris 2015 are reasons to be hopeful: on the multilateral and on the international economic scale many promising approaches like the ‘divestment’-initiatives are emerging. Furthermore there are several climate-friendly dynamics observable, which more often arise bottom-up via corporations than top-down in the form of international agreements; effectively those bottom-up approaches nevertheless increase the chances of an internationally accepted climate-treaty. Another light at the end of the tunnel was the absence of a unified block of climate sceptics: Dirk Messner interprets this fact in the way that ‘the movement of climate-protection has won the sovereignty of interpretation on the future of global economy’.

By Prof. Dr. Dirk Messner, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Käte Hamburger Kolleg / Centre for Global Cooperation Research

The Current Column (DIE), 25 September 2014, Bonn

Security in Southeast Asia - Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte (APuZ 40–41/2014)

Claudia Derichs, Senior Fellow Research Unit 2, in an article on the hegemony of the narrative of the nation state in Southeast Asia. In her article Derichs describes the history of the regions which nowadays get subsumed under the term "Southeast Asia". However, before the colonial time the inhabitants of the different regions more often defined themselves within their affilliation to a certain clan, job or language. Nevertheless there were state-like entities and distinct economic networks. The different religions also played an important role in several regions and were closely interlinked to economy and politics. The concept of the nation state thus is insufficient in order to describe the different regions in their complexity, dynamics and characteristics.

Claudia Derichs: "Grundzüge der Geschichte Südostasiens", in: Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte (APuZ 40–41/2014)

The German article is online on the website of the Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung, there you can also find a PDF-version of the whole issue.

Dr Felix Bethke

The Democratic Dividend of Non-Violent Resistance

Postdoc Fellow Felix Bethke co-authored an article on "The Democratic Dividend of Non-Violent Resistance" on Bretterblog, a blog dedicated to perspectives on global politics. The article refers to a more comprehensive research paper on "Non-Violent Resistance and the Survival of Democratic Regimes" written by Markus Bayer, Felix S. Bethke and Daniel Lambach. Both publications can be found online below.

Bayer, Markus / Bethke, Felix S. / Lambach, Daniel (2014): The Democratic Dividend of Non-Violent Resistance; in: Bretterblog - Perspektiven auf globale Politik

Bayer, Markus / Bethke, Felix S. / Lambach, Daniel (2014): Non-Violent Resistance and the Survival of Democratic Regimes

Feedback loops in a world of complexity: a cybernetic approach at the interface of foreign policy analysis and international relations theory

Frank Gadinger, Head of Research Unit 4, and Alumni Fellow Dirk Peters recently published an article on 'Feedback loops in a world of complexity: a cybernetic approach at the interface of foreign policy analysis and international relations theory'.

Gadinger, Frank / Peters, Dirk (2014): Feedback Loops in a World of Complexity: A Cybernetic Approach at the Interface of Foreign Policy Analysis and International Relations Theory, in: Cambridge Review of International Affairs.

Feedback Loops in a World of Complexity - A Cybernetic Approach at the Interface of Foreign Policy Analysis and International Relations Theory

The UN Secretariat's Influence on the Evolution of Peacekeeping

A seminal publication from Silke Weinlich, head of the research unit "(Im)possibility of Cooperation" at the Centre, deals with the efficiency of the United Nations involvement in peacekeeping. The book scrutinizes the role of the UN bureaucracy within the world organization with regard to the UN's most highly valued conflict management tool, peace operations.

Weinlich, Silke (2014): The UN Secretariat's Influence on the Evolution of Peacekeeping, Palgrave Macmillan.

The UN Secretariat's Influence on the Evolution of Peacekeeping

Independent Vision Group Calls for Inclusive Globalization, Warns Against 'Turning Inward'

Focused on its own, challenging agenda, Europe today seems at risk to loose the broader horizon of global development. Instead European citizens, their countries and polititians should play their part. Because inclusive global action, sustainable programmes on evironmental threats and a coordinated security policy are most pending.   

This is the key message of the Independent Vision Group’s Report 'Re-shaping global development: Will Europe lead? An Argument and a Call to Action', which was published on 6 May 2014. The Group, chaired by Baroness Margaret Jay of the UK, consists of experienced leaders from eight countries, among them Dirk Messner, Co-Director of the Käte Hamburger Kolleg / Centre for Global Cooperation Research (KHK/GCR21) and Director of the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).

'Global challenges such as climate change can only be tackled through global action', argues Dirk Messner. 'Thus, we must not allow Europe to turn inwards. The new EU parliament and the EU Commission will have the responsibility and the opportunity to renew Europe's global citizenship and partnership', states Messner on the occasion of the launch of the report in Bonn.

Re-Shaping Global Development: Will Europe Lead? An Argument and a Call to Action

A Renewables Club to change the world

The climate crisis needs an urgent international response, says IPCC. Additional forms of cooperation, such as clubs of pioneers, are needed in order to provide fresh impetus to climatechange mitigation efforts, argue Dirk Messner, Hans Joachim Schellnhuber and Jennifer Morgan.

Messner, Dirk / Morgan, Jennifer / Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim (2014): A Renewables Club to change the world, The Current Column of 28 April 2014, Bonn: German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE) 

The Current Column (DIE), 28 April 2014, Bonn

We Are in There Together with Germany: Observations by a Canadian

Our Senior Fellow Noemi Gal-Or joins the debate on the future of German foreign policy with a Canadian perspective. Read her take in a Current Columm Special of the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik.

By Prof. Noemi Gal-Or, Ph.D., LL.B., Käte Hamburger Kolleg / Centre for Global Cooperation Research

The Current Column (DIE), 21 February 2014, Bonn

BRICS — Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte (APuZ 50-51/2013)

'BRICS', the emerging economies of Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa are in the spotlight of the latest issue of 'Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte'. Forming an important forum to articulate common interests, the BRICS group came up in 2001 (South Africa joined in 2010) because they didn't feel adequately represented in international institutions.

Two contributions by members of the Centre and affiliates can be found in this issue:

Siddharth Mallavarapu: BRICS: Hoffnung auf eine gerechte Weltordnung – Essay

Tobias Debiel / Herbert Wulf:  Indien's BRICS Politik: Unentschlossen im Club

Read/Download (German):

APuZ 'BRICS' (2 Dec 2013)

The empirical falsity of the human subject: new materialism, climate change and the shared critique of artifice

Jessica Schmidt's article contributes to the resilience problematique through the ‘back door’: it is interested more broadly in the epistemological and political conversions that underpin, and are implied in, the rise of resilience as a policy programme.

Schmidt, Jessica (2013): The empirical falsity of the human subject: new materialism, climate change and the shared critique of artifice, in: Resilience - International Policies, Practices and Discourses, Routledge.  

Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte (APuZ 37/2013) 'Internationale Sicherheit'

The latest issue of 'Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte' focuses on international security—a particularly urgent theme at present. At the invitation of this flagship publication, produced by the 'German Federal Agency for Civic Education', seven of the Centre’s visiting researchers, hailing from four different continents, seek to throw light on topical issues and potential perils on the theme ‘Security and Cooperation’. The essays also provide a glimpse of the kinds of questions currently under investigation at the Centre.

M. Böckenförde · S. Mallavarapu · A. Jeng · H. Niemann · S. Brown · S. Van Beurden · H. Wulf · M. Thalwitz: "Sicherheit und Kooperation", in: Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte (63:37, 9 September 2013)

Read/Download (German) APuZ 'Internationale Sicherheit' (9 Sept 2013)

India's Aspirations in Global Politics. Competing Ideas and Amorphous Practices

India is an emerging power and its influence as well as the government’s aspirations in global politics has steadily been growing in recent years. The economy has experienced impressive growth but India’s political, social and economic development has neither been coherent nor smooth. The study looks at recent developments in India’s global aspirations, at the history of India’s foreign policy—with its shifts and changes—and at the ideological foundations of these different foreign affairs notions, namely idealism, realism and geopolitics, Hindu nationalism and the now predominant liberalisation and internationalisation concepts.

By Prof. Dr. Herbert Wulf, Senior Expert Fellow at the Käte Hamburger Kolleg / Centre for Global Cooperatione Research and Adjunct Senior Researcher at INEF

INEF-Report 107/2013
(Institute for Development and Peace, University of Duisburg-Essen, in cooperation with the Käte Hamburger Kolleg / Centre for Global Cooperation Research)

For a Different Europe of the Regions

For the essential reform of the European Union two major building blocks are missing: transformative policy and democratic legitimacy. Any acceleration towards a European economic and financial government must be approved and controlled by a European demos. This means that Parliament must have knowledge of and be involved in the resolution of the European sovereign debt crisis and the rescue of the Euro.

By Prof. Dr. Claus Leggewie, Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities (Kulturwissenschaftliches Institut Essen – KWI), Käte Hamburger Kolleg / Centre for Global Cooperation Research 

The Current Column (DIE), 17 September 2012, Bonn, Essen

Cooperation is the mother of all things: What is stopping us from solving globalisation problems?

The international financial crisis has made the limits to national regulatory systems abundantly clear. Yet it has not even proved possible to set up a body capable of actively supervising the European financial markets. The World Trade Organisation has made no progress for over a decade. Things do not look any better for global environment policy. Is globalisation asking too much of international organisations, governments and of us as human beings?

By Dr. Alejandro Guarín and Prof. Dr. Dirk Messner, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE) and Dr Silke Weinlich, Käte Hamburger Kolleg / Centre for Global Cooperation Research

The Current Column (DIE), 4 June 2012, Bonn, Duisburg

Cooperation in world society – effective und legitimate?

The need for trans-border and even global cooperation is steadily growing. How can this governing of the world without a world government be made more effective? How can the various actors interact in a way that transnational problems are not only addressed, but actually solved?

By Dr. Rainer Baumann and Prof. Dr. Tobias Debiel, Centre for Global Cooperation Research

The Current Column (DIE), 23 April 2012, Bonn, Duisburg

Cultures of cooperation

At the beginning of the 21st century the world is confronted with a kind of a cooperation paradox. It is popularly believed that cooperation is something in which actors pursuing common goals engage. The multipolar world is essentially in agreement on general objectives as economic growth and free trade, limiting climate change, reform of the financial markets or eradication of poverty. Despite all the normative and ideological convergence, the instruments, institutions and actors needed to turn the consensus into reality are lacking. Why is this?

By Prof. Dr. Claus Leggewie, Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities (KWI)

The Current Column (DIE), 12 March 2012, Bonn, Essen